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Monday, January 17, 2011

Glazed, but Not Confused - Glazing 101 & A Glazing Link Party

I'd like to start out by saying that I'm in no way any kind of professional on this.  I'm just here to show you what works for me.  Once you start glazing, you'll likely to find other tips and techniques that work better for you.  So if something I've told you doesn't work out, please don't come beat me up.  Kidding, kidding!  Seriously, though, I hope someone is able to use what I'm sharing to create beautiful pieces just like I feel I've done.  Alright, let's get this show on the road!

There are several types of glaze out there and the most popular that I've seen are the tintable glazes.  I chose not to go that route because I didn't want to invest too much money in something that I wasn't even sure would work.  I ended up getting this small (half-pint) bottle of Valspar Antiquing Glaze in Asphaltum, which is basically black.


It cost me around $9.  It seemed pricey to me, but I found that with glaze, a little goes a long way.  I've only used 1/4 of the bottle and I've done all of these projects.



Whew!  That's a lot!  I didn't realize just how much that little bit of glaze had done until I went looking for photos.  

Now that you can see just how far you can go with just a little glaze, let's get down to the nitty-gritty.  The how to.

Step 1:  Find your object.  I recommend using something that isn't all that important to you on your first try, just in case it doesn't work out.   Use something from around the house or head on out to a thrift store and get something cheap, but also something you like.  Make sure it's clean before you paint it.


Step 2: Paint your item.  I just use acrylic craft paint.  My favorite brand is Folk Art.  Since it's flat, I don't prime.  You may choose to prime, I don't.  I usually do at least 2 coats of paint.  I sometimes do more depending on how well it's covering.  You don't have to get full covereage because the glaze will most likely cover any flaws, but I do try to get mine as evenly covered as possible.  Anything with grooves, will just be getting glaze in those spots so don't sweat it if you can get it fully painted. The bottle of glaze says to make sure you let your item dry at least 24 hours.  I don't usually do this.  I wait a few hours and then get to it.


Step 3:  Gather your glazing supplies.
  • your item
  • glaze
  • paint brushes (make sure at least one is one of those tiny pointy ones)
  • soft cloths (I use those t-shirt rags that Goodwill sells as cleaning cloths)
  • plastic cup of water (to rest your brush in)

Step 4: Start glazing
  • Shake your bottle of glaze to make sure it's mixed well.  
  • Working in small sections at a time, brush on some glaze, making sure to get down in any nooks and crannies.  
  • Then take a dry cloth and start wiping the glaze off.  
  • Repeat the last two actions until your whole piece has been glazed.
 glaze on

 glaze off


TIPS
*Don't rub too hard because you'll probably find yourself rubbing the base paint off.  If you do this, you can always go back and touch it up.  I'm not sure if this is something priming or letting the painted piece cure the full 24 hours will help, but I'm just too impatient for all of that.  I've just learned to be very careful when wiping.  I usually don't have a problem with this while doing wood pieces so it's probably a priming/curing issue.  Anyway, just do what you think is best.

*You'll probably find some places where the glaze has really settled into some of the crevices.  Like, settled a little too much.  This is where that little brush comes in handy.  Just dip it into your cup of water and then use it to break up some of the pooled glaze.  Use your cloth to wipe away the watery excess.

*If you don't like the way a section looks, you can use some water on a brush and your dry cloth to remove some of the glaze (it's workable for up to 15 mins).  Then just reglaze that section.

*Don't worry about messing the piece up by holding it by an already glazed section.  I do it all the time and it hasn't been an issue.  You'll get some glaze on your hand, but it washes right off.

*I've found on some of the bigger pieces that I needed more than one cloth.  I guess when the glaze builds up on the cloth, it doesn't work as well.  Just be prepared.

* Sometimes a wait a few hours and then go over the piece with some Polycrylic, but I don't always since the glaze gives the piece a nice sheen itself.


That's it!!  You're all finished and you hopefully have given an ordinary object an awesome makeover.


I've decided to make this an indefinite linky party.  If you've used glaze before, link up your projects.  If you learned something from this post and have decided to use glaze for the first time, please link up so I can see your masterpieces!


Linking to:
Get Your Craft On @ Today's Creative Blog
Take a Look Tues @ Sugar Bee 
Frugal Friday @ The Shabby Nest 
Fab Friday @ Frugal & Fabulous Design
Fridays Unfolded @ Stuff and Nonsense
Remodelaholic's Anyon @ Remodelaholic 
SNS @ Funky Junk Interiors


53 crafty peeps said:

  1. Thank you so much for posting this! I have been really curious about how to create this look and had no idea it was that easy!

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  2. That is a great tutorial! Thank you for linking!

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  3. I absolutely swear by that stuff! I've had the same bottle of glaze since June and have done several big pieces of furniture, not to mention all the little things I've thrown it on :) I've also noticed that it sometimes rubs the base paint off...but only when I use it over acrylic paint. If I use it over spraypaint, I've never rubbed hard enough to get it the base color off. But sometimes with acrylic, it will even if it's sat for a day. It probably is a primer thing :) Great post- I'm glad you let everyone know about the amazing power of glaze!

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  4. Great tutorial! You are right, it lasts forever. I have a jar of that stuff and hardly put a dent in it.

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  5. I love this!!! I need to try some.

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  6. I love what glaze can do to things! It's so fun & changes things so quickly! I'm in the process of re-doing my kitchen table & I'm finishing with glaze.
    ~Mary
    www.thecraftygals.blogspot.com

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  7. Great tutorial! I love glaze, although I haven't tried Valspar . . . yet! I usually mix my own unless I can find a premixed one on sale.

    Would love to have you share this at Passion for Paint this weekend!

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    1. How do you make your own glaze? Very interested in knowing. Thanks

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  8. I love all your glazed projects, Kristi! I was looking for a Ralph Lauren glaze at Home Depot this past weekend, but they didn't have what I wanted. I may have to try this one. I have a few things that I'd like to glaze, especially those thrift store gold frames I find!

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  9. Glazing always looks so complicated and scary to me. You made it sound a lot easier than I thought. Thanks!

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  10. Great tutorial, Kristi! I've been wanting to try glazing but I didn't have any idea where to start. Thanks for the info.

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  11. You're a glazing pro! I love how you use bright colors with your glaze. It looks fantastic. Thank you for the tips! I need all the tips I can get! ;)

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  12. I featured this today - Today's Top 20!

    Woo Hoo!
    Amanda
    www.todaystoptwenty.blogspot.com

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  13. Thanks for the tutorial! Awesome projects!

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  14. This is a great tutorial and I will be running out the door today to buy some Valspar glaze! I found your blog from "Today's Creative Blog."

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  15. I came here from Today's Creative Blog and I'm glad I did! Beautiful work.

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  16. I like what you're doing with the glazes! I have a cabinet that I'm painting and think it needs some extra dimension. I'm headed to Lowes and picking up some glaze. Yeah to Today's Creative Blog for featuring you.

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  17. Visiting from your feature on TCB! I too have always been afraid of Glaze--not now! Headed to Lowes...Thanks!

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  18. i love these pieces! i don't know why i've never thought of doing stuff like this before!! stopping by from tcb!

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  19. Hi--I found you via Today's Creative Blog--I just wanted to let you know your stuff is awesome! you take things I wouldn't second-glance and turn them into beauties!!!

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  20. What a great tutorial. I really want to use glaze now. I'll have to link up if I do :) Thanks for sharing!

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  21. found you through today's creative blog...i love your things...and i now have hope for all those things i was going to give to goodwill, but now think i want to keep. my husband will have a cow....

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  22. Love all these tips. It really makes me want to go and make over some things! found you over at today's creative blog

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  23. CUTE stuff!! Congrats on being featured at TCB!!!

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  24. I AM GOING TONIGHT TO BUY SOME GLAZE!! so glad I saw this before I painted furniture for my daughters room....if it works well, I might use it on her furniture!!!

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  25. I am so happy you posted this on Fridays Unfolded. I have wanted to glaze but didn't know what product to use and didn't want to waste money buying the wrong thing. Thanks so much for the helpful info!

    Alison
    Stuff and Nonsense

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  26. This is great! I am so interested in trying to get some pots glazed using your technics! They are beautiful!

    Becky B.
    www.organizingmadefun.blogspot.com
    Organizing Made Fun

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  27. Thank you so much for the how to on this! Looks easy enough. Till I try it right lol!

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  28. I love this tutorial! Thanks so much for sharing! I posted it with a few of my favorite tutorials and linked back to you. We are new followers!

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  29. I love your pedestal bowls! Thanks for the glazing tip, I've got my glaze and looking forward to trying it once the weather warms up a bit. I'm wondering if you just use the little acrylic paints from the craft store in the little bottle. Also, what brand & colors do you use??? I especially like the grayish blue one and the turquoise one is fabulous too. Thanks!!!

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  30. great tutorial!!! By the way I love the Teal and Turquoise frame and urns. LOVE THEM!!

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  31. Wow. Thanks for posting this! I've been wanting to try this, but had no idea where to go. Now I do. :)

    xoxox
    Erin
    www.erintagledesign.com

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  32. thanks for the great info... i never knew how glazing worked before! ( -:

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  33. Thanks so much for the tutorial! Glazing de-mystified for me =)

    -caroline @ c.w.frosting

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  34. Great tutorial - just what I was looking for! I'm linking my first real glazing project up.

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  35. I just stumbled upon your great tutorial. I'm excited to try my hand at this!

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  36. I did a candlestick to make a pedestal and had no problem with the glaze. However, I am trying to glaze some old metal trays and having trouble. I sprayed them with a metal primer and then spray paint, but the surface is rough, and the glazing just doesn't come out right. Any idea of what I could do...maybe seal it with something but what? I may end up just going back over the trays with acrylic paint.

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  37. I wonder, too, evelania, what color was used on the gorgeous turquoise frame.

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  38. We featured your project today, beautiful work.
    http://southernbelleshoppes.ning.com/group/craft-ideas
    Stop by and say hi.
    Jackie.

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  39. What if have a painted (purchased) frame that possibly has a coat of polyurethane on it? Will the glaze still work??

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  40. Hello there! I am really curious as to where you got your cake stands with glass toppers?! Please help a gal out! :]

    Danni

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  41. Love the frame and cake stand. Really all but was wondering what color paint u used for that frame. I love it! Thanks

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    Replies
    1. Exactly what I am wondering! I'm looking for a turquoise paint...what color is this!?

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  42. What is the base blue color on the cake stand with the shells.

    Thanks for sharing,
    Marie

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  43. This is incredible!!! I found this on Pinterest. I am decorating my livingroom and I am for sure using this. Thank You!!!

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  44. Thank you for sharing this! I did a little antiquing in the 70's then life got in the way. This is a great reminder that it is alive and well, and I'm ready to work with glazes again!

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  45. Your work is wonderful... thanks for the tips. One question, for the colored pieces, did you do the base color (for example bright green) first, then do the glaze over that, or visa versa?

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  46. Love all of your pieces! I haven't tried an official "glaze" but usually use a wood stain over painted pieces...and I think it may give a similar effect? Has anyone used a wood stain over paint AND the glaze for a point of comparison? Just wondering if it's worth grabbing a glaze or sticking to the minwax...thanks in advance!

    -Melissa

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  47. I am going to glaze my kitchen cabinets. The base coat is already a light mint green but I want to give it a little more character. Any suggestions about such large surfaces? THX!

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  48. These pieces are simply amazing! What a difference! Going to try it today on 2 small unicorns I bought at an auction yesterday. Wish me luck.

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  49. Awesome creation !! I just loved it .

    Martin Jonson
    cake stand
    cake stands

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  50. I was wondering if you could tell me where you bought the blue colors used for the keys(both blues)and the vintage white for the sconces

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  51. I was wondering if you could tell me where you bought the blue colors used for the keys(both blues)and the vintage white for the sconces

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